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Sean Rosenthal


cookiekitten91:

You guys remember Golbat’s gen I sprite?

cookiekitten91:

You guys remember Golbat’s gen I sprite?



thepaperplaneofexistence:

describing eye colors isn’t actually v helpful as a description??? talk about the makeup smeared on the left side, the lines under their eyes, the sloppily cut hair obscuring their eyes from view, how bloodshot or sunken they seem in the face, how wide they go at the slightest sound, how glassy and unblinking they seem, how they’re always darting away

all of that tells me a bit more about the character than whatever shade of gemstone they most resemble, seriously



rolan-pard:

“every time you post something online the entire world sees it”

yeah then explain to me why my post doesn’t have more notes



niggaqueef:

when you sat in a weird position for a long time and you move and then your foot feels like this

image



finnthehumanbi:

Maybe Pixar refuses to make a sequel because they know they’ll ever top this



saint-georgeii:

scp-l4-clef-alto-001:

Taking a step away from talking about SCP Foundation and Creepypasta stuff for this.
gethenian:

missdoodle:

blackandgreyrainbow:

Real Christians aren’t assholes

…
For her the heart and soul of being a Christian was to love others and treat others with dignity. She was a real Christian. 

Casual reminder that “Christianity” is not one single set of rules and beliefs.
… 
"Real" Christians can have so many different beliefs it’s hard to recognize them as belonging to the same blanket religion sometimes. And some of them really, really are assholes and think God has given them the right to be. But others really, really are not, and have been fighting to accept all people for a long time, and are succeeding, little by little, in places that really matter and give that kind of acceptance visibility not just on a local level, but nationwide, and worldwide.
…
You can be Christian and not be full of fear and hate.

One of the hardest things about trying to be Christian in the modern world is recognizing that there are a LOT of people out there who have been hurt by the Church. Some were molested by priests. Others were scammed by unscrupulous con artists. Still others have faced hatred and anger and discrimination from the same people who claim to follow a man who preached love and acceptance, who broke bread with whores and outcasts, and who shouted down the self-righteous.
As a Christian, there are a few ways to deal with this. One is to join the ranks of hatred and anger… for whatever reason you choose. A second is to deny or distance yourself from these people, and claim that they are not “Real Christians.”
That second way is the way that a lot of well-meaning and understanding, accepting people try to deal with this problem. I think it’s the wrong way.
When you, as a Christian, face someone who has been hurt by the church… they are not necessarily seeing “you,” a good and decent person who hates discrimination and loves everyone. They are seeing “A Christian,” a member of a group that has hurt them. There is a wound there, and like a boil or an infection… sometimes it needs to be lanced. Sometimes it needs to be sliced open, painfully so, and the infection needs to be drained.
——-
I’m going to digress for a moment and tell a short story.
A person very close to me works in Pastoral Education. She had a student who… for one reason or another… is not exactly a high achiever. She’s slow to learn. My friend is a very high achiever, and often has trouble dealing with low achievers… and this played out in her relationship with her student.
And in the middle of a counseling session, suddenly her student became very angry. She started screaming about how all her life, she’s been treated like crap by her teachers. Called idiotic, stupid, and all sorts of other things.
My friend had a choice. She could go on the defensive and point out that she was not one of those teachers… has never done those things.
She did the more courageous… the harder thing… instead. She looked at her student, and very calmly, said this:
"I understand now the pain that you must have been carrying all your life because of the way your teachers have mistreated you. And I am a member of that same group that has mistreated you. I can’t change what has happened in your past. But I can, as a teacher, say this: I am sorry for what they have done, and I am sorry if I have in any way hurt you."
The student broke down crying in her office. “I’ve never heard a teacher say I’m sorry,” she admitted. 
That student may never be a high achiever. My friend may always have a tense and difficult relationship with them. But… at the very least, that student may be able to put away from them the pain that they’ve been carrying for so long.
——-
Christians have a choice. When faced with someone who has been hurt by the church, you can distance yourself from the wound. You can turn your face away because the wound is ugly and nasty and hurtful. You have the right, after all. You didn’t cause that wound.
"Real Christians don’t hurt others. I’m not like them. Please don’t blame me."
Or you can look at it head on and, using your role as a member of that SAME GROUP that has caused them pain… begin the healing process by saying the words that can help lance the wound. Can help drain the infection.
"I am sorry for what Christians have done to you. It was wrong. Please forgive us."
You might not have the strength to do this now. That’s okay. You can’t help others if you yourself are too wounded. It’s difficult taking on the sins of others onto yourself. It’s not easy trying to comfort a wounded person while dealing with your own wounds. 
But… there’s a really cool book about a guy who did just that for others.
Maybe reading that can help you.
- RL Clef
Who, as a lapsed Methodist, still wishes to tell anyone who has ever been hurt by a Christian, "I am sorry for the pain you have suffered because of what Christians have done to you. I can’t take that pain away. But as a Christian, I can say this. It was wrong. I humbly ask you to forgive us."

I agree with most of what is being said. I truly believe that Christians should love their neighbors as they love themselves. But as Christians we are also told to turn away from sin (in our own lives), and that’s not exactly easy or popular to do. It is important to show humility, by accepting that we have done wrong to others and to ask for their forgiveness, but in loving others we should also remember to keep our focus on Christ, to leave our old sinful life and to become a new creation. 

saint-georgeii:

scp-l4-clef-alto-001:

Taking a step away from talking about SCP Foundation and Creepypasta stuff for this.

gethenian:

missdoodle:

blackandgreyrainbow:

Real Christians aren’t assholes

For her the heart and soul of being a Christian was to love others and treat others with dignity. She was a real Christian. 

Casual reminder that “Christianity” is not one single set of rules and beliefs.

… 

"Real" Christians can have so many different beliefs it’s hard to recognize them as belonging to the same blanket religion sometimes. And some of them really, really are assholes and think God has given them the right to be. But others really, really are not, and have been fighting to accept all people for a long time, and are succeeding, little by little, in places that really matter and give that kind of acceptance visibility not just on a local level, but nationwide, and worldwide.

You can be Christian and not be full of fear and hate.

One of the hardest things about trying to be Christian in the modern world is recognizing that there are a LOT of people out there who have been hurt by the Church. Some were molested by priests. Others were scammed by unscrupulous con artists. Still others have faced hatred and anger and discrimination from the same people who claim to follow a man who preached love and acceptance, who broke bread with whores and outcasts, and who shouted down the self-righteous.

As a Christian, there are a few ways to deal with this. One is to join the ranks of hatred and anger… for whatever reason you choose. A second is to deny or distance yourself from these people, and claim that they are not “Real Christians.”

That second way is the way that a lot of well-meaning and understanding, accepting people try to deal with this problem. I think it’s the wrong way.

When you, as a Christian, face someone who has been hurt by the church… they are not necessarily seeing “you,” a good and decent person who hates discrimination and loves everyone. They are seeing “A Christian,” a member of a group that has hurt them. There is a wound there, and like a boil or an infection… sometimes it needs to be lanced. Sometimes it needs to be sliced open, painfully so, and the infection needs to be drained.

——-

I’m going to digress for a moment and tell a short story.

A person very close to me works in Pastoral Education. She had a student who… for one reason or another… is not exactly a high achiever. She’s slow to learn. My friend is a very high achiever, and often has trouble dealing with low achievers… and this played out in her relationship with her student.

And in the middle of a counseling session, suddenly her student became very angry. She started screaming about how all her life, she’s been treated like crap by her teachers. Called idiotic, stupid, and all sorts of other things.

My friend had a choice. She could go on the defensive and point out that she was not one of those teachers… has never done those things.

She did the more courageous… the harder thing… instead. She looked at her student, and very calmly, said this:

"I understand now the pain that you must have been carrying all your life because of the way your teachers have mistreated you. And I am a member of that same group that has mistreated you. I can’t change what has happened in your past. But I can, as a teacher, say this: I am sorry for what they have done, and I am sorry if I have in any way hurt you."

The student broke down crying in her office. “I’ve never heard a teacher say I’m sorry,” she admitted. 

That student may never be a high achiever. My friend may always have a tense and difficult relationship with them. But… at the very least, that student may be able to put away from them the pain that they’ve been carrying for so long.

——-

Christians have a choice. When faced with someone who has been hurt by the church, you can distance yourself from the wound. You can turn your face away because the wound is ugly and nasty and hurtful. You have the right, after all. You didn’t cause that wound.

"Real Christians don’t hurt others. I’m not like them. Please don’t blame me."

Or you can look at it head on and, using your role as a member of that SAME GROUP that has caused them pain… begin the healing process by saying the words that can help lance the wound. Can help drain the infection.

"I am sorry for what Christians have done to you. It was wrong. Please forgive us."

You might not have the strength to do this now. That’s okay. You can’t help others if you yourself are too wounded. It’s difficult taking on the sins of others onto yourself. It’s not easy trying to comfort a wounded person while dealing with your own wounds. 

But… there’s a really cool book about a guy who did just that for others.

Maybe reading that can help you.

- RL Clef

Who, as a lapsed Methodist, still wishes to tell anyone who has ever been hurt by a Christian, "I am sorry for the pain you have suffered because of what Christians have done to you. I can’t take that pain away. But as a Christian, I can say this. It was wrong. I humbly ask you to forgive us."

I agree with most of what is being said. I truly believe that Christians should love their neighbors as they love themselves. But as Christians we are also told to turn away from sin (in our own lives), and that’s not exactly easy or popular to do. It is important to show humility, by accepting that we have done wrong to others and to ask for their forgiveness, but in loving others we should also remember to keep our focus on Christ, to leave our old sinful life and to become a new creation. 



"Thoughts are the shadows of our feelings — always darker, emptier, simpler."
— Friedrich Nietzsche (via devil-may-smile)